Rules and structure have always been very important to me. It is probably why I chose to study accounting in college. Accounting follows very logical rules, and at the end of the day, the math adds up and is reconcilable. Black and white thinkers like me love this about accounting.

Rules, however, must make sense. There must be a method behind the madness. We often go into parks and find rules and regulations in place than not only make NO sense, but they are a hinderance to the overall guest experience.

One recent example is a park with, “No Dogs Over 40 pounds permitted in the park.” When I asked if it was a local code ordinance, they said, “No,” When I pressed further and asked why they had this rule, there was no reason. It was just always there. I pointed out that Labrador Retrievers are the number one breed in the US, and they are almost always over 40 pounds. The park, without any good reason, was banning guests who own the most popular breed in the nation.

Another absurd interaction was with a GM who had refused to allow coffee makers in the cabins. When we ordered them and they arrived on site, there was major pushback. There was-again-no good reason for this rule. When pressed, the GM replied, “They can walk to the office to get coffee.” Clearly, guests do not want to get dressed and walk up the road just to get a cup of coffee. Again, rules with no diminishing the guest experience.

Code compliance rules are one thing and are meant for matters pertaining to health and safety. Random rules with no rhyme or reason are often made by staff who do not wish to deal with pets, children, guests-or coffee. This is a bad precedence to set for any hospitality venue. The goal of a park is to make the guest experience one of fun, relaxation, pampering, and overall enjoyment. Check your rules and make sure your guests are not hearing, “No, No, No,” when “Yes,” is a much more welcoming word.